Sufficiency Economy Stresses on the Concept of Having Enough to Live On

Based on common sense and rationality, the Sufficiency Economy philosophy of His Majesty King Bhumibol Adulyadej stresses on the concept of having enough to live on, moderation, reasonableness, and immunity.

In the royal speech to an audience and well-wishers on the eve of the royal birthday anniversary on 4 December 1974, His Majesty gave an explanation about this concept.

“What others may say does not matter, whether they say that Thailand is old-fashioned or that we are out-dated. Anyway, we have enough to live on and to live for, and this should be the wish and determination of all of us to see self-sufficiency in this country. It is not that we will attain supreme prosperity, but we will have a sustainable and peaceful country. If we keep this sustainability, we already can be considered the top in comparison with other countries, beset as they are by crises and decline due to greed and rivalry form power, economic and industrial progress and in matters of ideology. So, for me, it will prove to be a birthday present of lasting value and benefit if each of you, with your ideas and power of persuasion, enjoin on others who also have the same intentions, the determination to preserve the community so that we are able to enjoy this reasonable way of life – and I stress the reasonable, sustainable, and peaceful conditions – defending ourselves against anyone who may want to rob us of our innate qualities.”

Following the 1997 economic crisis, His Majesty the King also touched on the topic of the Sufficiency Economy concept in his royal speech to an audience and well-wishers. The speech was made on the eve of his birthday anniversary on 4 December 1997 at Dusidalai Hall, Chitralada Villa, Dusit Palace.

“I repeat myself again and again on the subjects of trade, goods consumption, production, and sales, because I think that everyone is concerned with the crisis. All people – from the have-nots to the well-to-do – are in trouble. But if the situation can change back to an economy that is self-sufficient – it does not have to be a hundred percent, or even fifty percent, but perhaps only twenty-five percent – it will be bearable. The remedy will take time; it will not be easy. Usually one is impatient because one suffers, but if it is done from this moment on, the recovery is possible. In fact, in this gathering, there are economists in various fields who must understand why I speak in this way.”

Leave a Reply